Skip to Content

May 2009

About Us

Temporary About Us

Superbug kills 2 tots in baby unit

TWO premature tots have died and 16 others infected in a superbug outbreak at a hospital’s intensive care baby unit.

The SUN
By EMMA MORTON, Health Editor and JOHN TROUP

25 Oct 2008Last night the neo-natal centre was shut to fresh newborns. Visitors were barred except for parents of babies there. Health chiefs confirmed a deadly drug-resistant strain of E.coli — often spread through poor hygiene — hit three weeks ago at Bedfordshire’s Luton and Dunstable Hospital.T he Health Protection Agency was investigating. Hospital bosses stressed the two babies who died were already fighting for life and that E.coli did not directly kill them. But a spokesman admitted: “It’s likely to have contributed to the deaths.” The hospital was given a warning about hygiene three months ago.

Two of nine premature infants to get the bug were ill but responding to treatment. Seven others have the bacteria in their gut. The hospital insisted the outbreak was “under control”.

Slipping through cell walls, nanotubes deliver high-potency punch to cancer tumors in mice

8/17/2008

The problem with using a shotgun to kill a housefly is that even if you get the pest, you'll likely do a lot of damage to your home in the process. Hence the value of the more surgical flyswatter.

Cancer researchers have long faced a similar situation in chemotherapy: how to get the most medication into the cells of a tumor without "spillover" of the medication adversely affecting the healthy cells in a patient's body.

750 Get Hospital Superbug

Amanda Crook
24/10/2008

More than 750 people were diagnosed with the superbug clostridium difficile in three months at Greater Manchester hospitals - but this was a drop on last year.

New figures show fewer people in the region suffered from the vomiting and diarrhoea bug between April and June than for the same period last year.

Vaccines of the Future Could be Delivered by Mosquitoes

BANGKOK, Thailand, October 22, 2008 (ENS)

Hiroyuki Matsuoka at Jichi Medical University in Japan thinks it may be possible to turn mosquitoes that normally transmit disease into "flying syringes," so that when they bite humans they deliver vaccines.

Researchers use nanotech to target chemo cancer treatment

By Sharon Gaudin

August 19, 2008 University researchers have found a way to use nanotechnology to have chemotherapy drugs target only cancer cells, keeping healthy tissue safe from the treatment's toxic effects.

Microbiana Home Page

photo1

Learning about and from Microbes

Satinath Sarangi, Sambhavana,
Bhopal - January 31, 2009

I will speak first about my concern regarding microbial resistance that is related to my life as the managing trustee of a charitable clinic. I live and work in a city that was devastated by the worst industrial disaster that is ongoing even 24 years after itsoccurrence. The city is Bhopal in central India and the disaster was caused by the leakage of an extremely toxic chemical that leaked from a pesticide factory owned and operated by an American multinational corporation.